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Wolf Spider
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The wolf spiders are members of the family Lycosidae. Except for the genus Sosippus, these spiders do not use their silk to make a snare. Some use their silk to line a tubular tunnel in the ground. Some take regular shelter in natural crevices. Still others spend their entire lives wandering around with no fixed abode. Unlike many other spiders, they have good vision and they chase their prey. Some wolf spiders are very small, 0.2" or smaller, and others are rather large, 1" or more. Hogna carolinensis (the "Carolina wolf spider") is the largest U.S. species, with a body that can be more than one inch long.

Female wolf spiders carry their eggs along with them in spherical, silk egg sacs attached to their spinnerets. After the eggs hatch, the multitude of tiny spiders climb onto their mother's abdomen, where she carries them for a considerable period of time.
Distribution
This family of spiders is found worldwide.
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